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Samothraki Island – pebbled beaches, goat dishes, bouzouki music

 The term "vathres" is specific for Samothraki Island. It means a small lake created at the feet of a waterfall, which is formed after the water has run through a canyon. I swam in the chill water of the vathres of Fonias and this way, I could better see the waterfall hidden behind some rocks.

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The following are abstracts from Mrs Iuliana Marchian's article for Samothraki in her travel blog: Authentic Travels

The term "vathres" is specific for Samothraki Island. It means a small lake created at the feet of a waterfall, which is formed after the water has run through a canyon. I swam in the chill water of the vathres of Fonias and this way, I could better see the waterfall hidden behind some rocks. After that, I climbed a steep footpath to a lookout point where I had a panoramic view of the waterfall.  


I came back along the valley to my car and then continued to drive along the coastline until I reached one of the most secluded and remote beaches of the island, Kipos Beach. The pebbled beach sat hidden in a small bay at the feet of a rocky mountain. Unfortunately, it was facing the east, so the mountain shadowed it early in the afternoon. A valley with shrubs and herds of goats grazing around started from the beach and went up into the mountain.


In the morning, I went to Paleopolis, at the Sanctuary of the Great Gods where religious rituals were practiced by the ancient Greeks. The famous statue of Victory of Samothrace, exposed in the Louvre Museum nowadays, was found in this place. The archaeological site was built nearby the fortifications of Samothraki ancient town. The ancient site included: temples, a sacristy, a sacred way going toward the ionic portico, a circular space for representations, the propylaeum of Ptolemaeus II, the southern necropolis, and a theater (not entirely excavated, though). At the stoa, a team of archaeologists worked with small brooms and hoes and thus cleaned the ancient stones from plants and earth. It was a very hot day and the cicadas sang in the shade of the trees.


In the evening, my Greek neighbor Kostas invited me for a drink at his caravan. He didn’t speak English well, but a woman with her little girl who were there translated for me a bit. Kostas even had a fridge and a sink outside the caravan and had been coming to this campground every summer for the past forty years.

We dined together at a local taverna in Therma, and we ate katsikaki with potatoes and beans with a big Greek salad. After that, we went to the bouzouki and baklamas concert of Kostas’s friends. Dimitrios played bouzouki, Maria baklamas, and Alexis kitara. All Kostas’s friends loved Samothraki. Each of them told me how much they had been enjoying the island. People drank, smoked, and the concert lasted until late at night.

To read the full article, click here